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Quadrat surveys on Mangrove forests in Borneo

Satellite view of Borneo within Mappt, where we will explore the ability to conduct Quadrat Surveys on Mangrove Forests.

Satellite view of Borneo within Mappt, where we will explore the ability to conduct Quadrat Surveys on Mangrove Forests.

The unique power and simplicity of Mappt lies in its’ ability to handle large amounts of data stored in layers with various formats and structures. This was previously very difficult to achieve in a device as small as an Android tablet. Gone are the days of lugging bulky laptops, hard drives, data folders and antennae of various shapes and sizes in order to complete field work tasks! Now Mappt even allows you to collect field data completely offline, without any connectivity dependencies to WiFi, cellular or otherwise.

We’re always excited about describing novel ways to digitise and store complex data within Mappt. Especially when prior data collection methods were particularly tedious to scribe (usually on paper) and then transcribe onto digital computers later for storage, formatting and analysis! This is true for the case of conducting Quadrat Surveys – a method commonly used in vegetation/coastal surveys designed to monitor all aspects of the environment, fauna and flora. Even just 5 years ago during my Environmental Science degree, we were still conducting Quadrat surveys with a physical Quadrat square made out of PVC pipe.. and we’d spend all afternoon writing out a huge range of data attributes by hand for each sampling location. Then of course, no one could ever find their field notes when it came to put the data together in group projects..

I’m getting a bit side-tracked, but it is legitimately exciting to return to Quadrat surveys with a savvy new digital tool in Mappt. Below I’ll go into detail on using the gridding tool for conducting Quadrat surveys, with a focus on mangrove areas in Borneo. Be sure to get out your tablets and load up Mappt to follow along!

Quadrat surveys using Mappt Grid Tool

To begin our excursion into quadrat surveys with Mappt, what we are doing is essentially achieving an identical sampling outcome using a digital version of a quadrat. This has many benefits; you don’t need to lug around and physically place a big quadrat on your sampling locations in the field, you won’t disturb any flora or fauna and you can rely solely on GPS within a handheld map on a tablet to know your location at all times. These benefits will all lead to higher quality data, whilst also greatly simplifying the field work process. Win-win!

borneo mangrove qudarat survey restoration rehabilitation

Defined mangrove restoration areas have been digitised in Mappt for quadrat sampling.

You will still need to define your quadrat areas and size etc first, following an established methodology. You can use random stratified sampling or another method to ensure statistical robustness in your quadrat sampling. Once this has been decided, you can produce precise GPS points for the quadrat survey and easily map out your points in Mappt. This is where the gridding tool comes in! To get started with creating a vector gridding layer:

  • Position the map centred on where you would like the grid to begin, you can enter precise GPS points after if desired
  • Tap on the  button to Add/Load Layer
  • Select ‘Insert Grid’ 
  • In the Grid Properties window, enter the specifications for your grid.

 

borneo mangrove sampling quadrat mappt grid tool

Once you have clicked Insert Grid in Mappt, this table will appear for customising grid properties.

You can change the grid’s position in the properties window that appears, by altering the Lat & Long values to match your precise sample location(s). In this table you can also set the cell units, number of rows, columns and cell size of the grid to match your Quadrat methodology. For example, if you plan on sampling 5x5m Quadrats, set the number of rows and columns each to 5 with a cell height and width of 1m. For the Borneo example, this will enable me to precisely map out survey points for mangrove flora within 1m2 squares within my 5x5m Quadrat. You can also set a bearing for the grid, if you need to have it laid on a particular angle over the landscape.

borneo qudrat survey grid tool mappt

Properties Window options for drawing your quadrat grid.

You can choose a naming convention for the cells within the grid using the drop-down in the Properties Window to suit your requirements.  In order to map points within the grid, you will need to set the grid type to Polygon. Lastly, be sure to set the Grid Type to vector for storing survey data within the Quadrat grid. Once you’re happy with your settings, click on ‘Create New Grid’.

Final list of options within the Properties WIndow for the Gridding tool.

Final list of options within the Properties WIndow for the Gridding tool.

Now we’re ready to start sampling with our fresh new Quadrat laid down! You should see something like the below on Mappt:

borneo quadrat survey mappt grid tool

Quadrat drawn over Borneo mangrove rehabilitation site using Mappt’s Grid Tool.

Adding Field Forms to Manage Complex Survey Data in Mappt

In order to begin adding sampling points within the Quadrat, we should first set up a field form so that we can quickly enter data for each new point in Mappt. To do this, long-press on the Quadrat layer you’ve just created to open the options table. Click on the Attributes Tab across the top then click the ‘Add’ button on the bottom of the page to begin adding data attributes.

Here you can add attributes to your field form for quick & easy data collection in the field.

Here you can add attributes to your field form for quick & easy data collection in the field.

There are a number of different Attribute Types that can be selected to fulfill different data format requirements. Select the most appropriate type for each of your desired data attributes. For example, for Species type/composition the best option would be a multi-select list, which you can fill out with a range of various species names to be included. Click on ‘Required’ and ‘Include in Wizard’ to ensure that a selection will be prompted each time a field worker adds a new point within a Quadrat survey. This is a great way to digitise the collection of a range of complex data, which is usually the case for Quadrat Surveys, in a simple form on a tablet!

borneo mangrove survey field data form

When adding a survey point, a list of Mangrove species to select appears from a pre-filled field form detailed above.

Repeat the above to add all unique data attributes required for your particular survey project. When it comes to adding survey points in the field, be sure that the appropriate Quadrat layer is selected for the survey data. Line up the crosshair on Mappt within the correct 1m2 square in the Quadrat, then click on the ‘Add Point’ button in the top-left of the Mappt screen. The Attribute Form Wizard will prompt the field worker to fill out the data for each attribute. Lastly, they will see a summary table in Mappt to confirm/rectify any issues before adding the point to the layer.

Field form summary table showing all the entries for each data attribute.

Field form summary table showing all the entries for each data attribute.

The field worker simply needs to repeat this for all the survey data they need to collect within each of the Quadrat areas that were decided for the sampling project! Mappt stores all of the data within the same project, which can easily be exported upon return from the field for use in a desktop or web-based GIS. Better yet, the project could be built in Mappt Air beforehand, so each field worker can simply upload their data to Mappt Air into a single, dynamic and synchronised project repository following each sampling exercise! No more duplication and recquisition of multiple data files streaming from an unmanageable amount of sources, no need for extensive time handling data management. For more info about this powerful collaboration & data synchronisation tool, check out the Mappt Air Website.

Exporting data from Mappt

To export the data manually, simply follow these steps:

  • Select the Export option using a touch gesture on the  button
  • Tick the boxes next to the layer(s) you would like to export
  • You are then able to select the format and delivery option for your data, each of these depending on your particular project requirements.

The Export window will ask you to select a file format to export from the list shown below. Shapefiles or CSV files will both be common outputs for Quadrat survey data, depending on the software that will be used for further analysis.

List of file format types to select for exporting your field survey data.

List of file format types to select for exporting your field survey data.

Following your data format selection, you will then be prompted to choose an output location for your data export. You can select to export the data to the file system of the tablet itself, or you can choose to export the data to external sources including Gmail, Google Drive and more for smooth data storage and management!

How do you use Mappt for field surveys? We always love to hear how our users are kicking their project goals with our favourite mobile mapping tool. Feel free to reach out to colby@takor.com.au any time with your success stories, and I’ll be sure to feature it in our blog. Also remember that support is always available if you have needs beyond this tutorial. No question is a silly question when it comes to GIS! You can reach out any time at support@takor.com.au with any queries.

If you would like to know more about using Mappt as an efficient and robust field inspection utility, please contact us at: support@mappt.com.au

Try Mappt today by downloading it from the Google Play Store

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Field Mapping in Geology: Mappt User Story

Geologist in the field using a smart device to measure strike and dip on a rock formation

Geologist in the field using a smart device to measure strike and dip on a rock formation.

Geologists working in the field often require various measurement and mapping instruments to record and distribute geological information, while working in tough environmental conditions.

Mappt is a mobile GIS mapping tool that enables geologists to simplify their arsenal for completing mapping projects in the field. Paul Wright, a Senior Exploration Geologist, loves the ease of use and features he can take advantage of for his field work, simply using Mappt and a tablet device.

“I like the adequate but not over the top functionality which makes learning it easy. Just enough to collect the critical aspects and get on with the job”

-Paul Wright, Senior Exploration Geologist

Mappt also makes use of the internal accelerometer of smart devices. This enables a suite of additional mapping features to provide important orientation measurements in the field, including strike and dip. Combined with the GPS functionality of such devices, field measurements and data can be recorded in Mappt without the need for cellular/WiFi.

Mappt strike and dip field data acquisition tool

pitch roll and yaw measurement collection with smart device field data measurements using mappt

 
Paul is currently working on a porphyry copper project in Central Qld, where he is due to launch into a geological mapping exercise. He will be using Mappt to quickly and accurately digitise polygons whilst in the field. Additionally, Paul can save himself a lot of time collecting orientation measurements of geological structures using Mappt’s strike & dip feature. After his initial experience with Mappt, Paul feels confident in its applicability for larger scale mapping projects in his portfolio. The wealth of features and simplicity of the Mappt solution will enable Paul to conduct his operations in the remote and challenging conditions in Papua new Guinea.
We look forward to continue working with Paul to provide a convenient and effective mapping solution for his work in central QLD and PNG.

-story by Colby ‘Big Dawg’ Bignell who recently joined the team at Mappt.  Colby has an exciting CV including implementation of shark detection and deterrent devices!

Colby "Big Dawg" Bignell


If you would like to know more about using Mappt as an efficient and robust field inspection utility, please contact us at: support@mappt.com.au

Try Mappt today by downloading it from the Google Play Store

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1m Positional Accuracy in Mappt using Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor

Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor & Mappt Mobile GIS

Measuring 60x100mm the Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor can provide 1m accuracy

Measuring 60x100mm the Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor can provide 1m accuracy

Thanks to the helpful folks at Bad Elf, we recently got our hands on the Bad Elf Surveyor Bluetooth GNSS* for testing with Mappt. Combining Mappt with an external source of positional information delivers higher  accuracy than using the on-board GNSS for mobile phones and tablets. It also reduces battery consumption and CPU load on your mobile device.

Vendors like Bad Elf also provide applications offering enhanced functionality for data logging, device configuration, and data QC. Using external GNSS sources makes determining your position less “black box” and more hands-on when it comes to resolving your location and understanding the level of accuracy provided.
Compact and Compatible
Paring the Bad Elf GNSS with Mappt follows the same procedure we’ve detailed in a previous blog. The compact design (100x 60x20mm) and long lasting battery make the Bad Elf a handy field companion for mobile mapping and data collection. With a small LCD screen yielding important GNSS information, the Bad Elf keeps you well aware of the positional information available to you.

GNSS information available from the Bad Elf's compact 35x25mm LCD screen

GNSS information available from the Bad Elf’s compact 35x25mm LCD screen

Increased Accuracy
When either mapping or collecting data in the field, increased positional accuracy is always a plus. Often it’s necessary to revisit the field to account for seasonal changes (in the case of environmental sciences) or for relocating benchmarks or critical infrastructure such as utilities. The Bad Elf Surveyor offers up to 1m accuracy, an improvement over the 3-5m accuracy achievable with tablets and mobile phones.

 

How does it do that?
The Bad Elf Surveyor uses information from three satellite constellations; GPS, GLONASS, and QZSS. Thus from wherever you are globally, there’s an increased probability that you will have the required four satellites to resolve your position. Many devices derive location from a single satellite constellation thus limiting the amount of satellites available to them. The Bad Elf Surveyor also implements SBAS, Satellite Based Augmentation System, to gain positions within 1m. Serving as an augmentation to Global Navigation Satellite Systems, it works by collecting raw positioning data from regional Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), computing error corrections, and sharing these corrections to users via a geostationary communications satellite. While southern hemisphere regions don’t have their own SBAS, Australia is currently implementing its own SBAS test-bed to be operational by January 2019.
Alongside SBAS, the Bad Elf Surveyor also implements PPP, Precise Point Positioning, which removes GNSS system errors providing a high level of position accuracy from a single receiver. This solution depends on GNSS satellite clock and orbit corrections. These corrections are delivered to the receiver via satellite to provide positioning accurate to within several deicmetres.

 

Mobile Device GPS Behavior Versus Dedicated GPS Units
Mobile device GNSS chipsets have been designed to compliment an integrated system (your tablet/phone) delivering a wide variety of applications. Just count the number of apps you’ve downloaded from the app store. Can you imagine carrying a separate component for each of these?  These mobile applications are optimized to reduce load on the system by reducing battery consumption and processor load. The optimisation for mobile GPS chipsets puts limiting battery usage at the top of the list with time-to-fix location second and positional accuracy third. Dedicated GNSS devices like Bad Elf devices flip this priority on it’s head, placing positional accuracy first followed by time-to-fix and lastly the reduction of battery power. While it may seem like the Bad Elf would quickly run out of juice, it can continuously stream Bluetooth GNSS information for 24 hours. We have yet to see a tablet with that type of battery power!

We took the Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor to our favourite bushland, Signal Hill Park

We took the Bad Elf GNSS Surveyor to our favourite bushland, Signal Hill Park

Mapping Tips n Tricks Learned Using the Bad Elf Surveyor
Creating Polygons in Mappt –  Turn on the enter polygon tool and record each significant point of the polygon (corners and inflection points) as you walk out the perimiter. This ensures that corners/vertices are not shortcut and an accurate shape of the area is recorded.  It’s possible to create polygons in Mappt using the GPS Tracking tool, then walking out the perimeter of the polygon, and finishing off by converting the polyline to a polygon to enclose the area. This method helps when moving continuously (such as when in a vehicle) as you don’t need to stop and record points around the area. However the points associated with your polyline are created at the frequency of GPS updates from your device and you may end up not recording those key corner points!
GNSS Location – Place your external GNSS device in a way that provides a clear view of the sky. Some websites suggest affixing the GNSS face-up to the top of your hat! While you will have great reception, this limits the opportunity to check parameters on the LCD screen. Affixing the GNSS to a surveyors staff gives you both a walking stick and place to mount your tablet. This setup affords both good GNSS reception and makes data entry easier as the tablet is held steady by the staff.  Note:  The team at Bad Elf are currently developing hardware designed with rapid mobile mapping in mind.

The crew at Bad Elf are working on a clever monopole mount for the Bad Elf Surveyor

The crew at Bad Elf are working on a clever monopole mount for the Bad Elf Surveyor

Bad Elf has developed an integrated GPS and mobile device monopole for rapid mobile mapping

Bad Elf has developed an integrated GPS and mobile device monopole for rapid mobile mapping

Bad Elf GNSS Logging – The Bad Elf allows continuous logging of points. After a hard day in the field, it’s nice to know how much ground you covered. Logged information can be downloaded as GPX files and visualised in desktop GIS solutions such as QGIS.

Signal Hill Park Map from QGIS. Bad Elf track points (orange) displaying the total ground covered in this mapping exercise.

Signal Hill Park Map from QGIS. Bad Elf track points (orange) displaying the total ground covered in this mapping exercise.

*GNSS, Global Navigation Satellite System, is the collective term for all navigation satellites groups (constellations) including GPS.

 

If you would like to know more about configuring an external GNSS to work with Mappt, please contacts us at: support@mappt.com.au

The Ultimate Fieldwork Preparation Checklist

How to successfully conduct a fieldwork expedition and enjoy yourself along the way.

This simple checklist provides a tool to ensure researchers, geologists, scientists or explorers are fully prepared for their journey.

We’ve also included some helpful tips and suggestions for an enjoyable expedition.

The Ultimate Fieldwork Preparation Checklist – Click Here to Download Free PDF

The-ultimate-fieldwork-preparation-checklist

Mappt Case Study: Rodinia Geological Services

Project Name: Klondyke
Date: April-September 2017 (ongoing)
Company: Rodinia Geological Services consulting to Calidus Resources (ASX:CAI)
Location: East Pilbara, Western Australia
Industry: Mineral Exploration

Background

Rodinia Geological Services is a geological consulting services company consisting of husband and wife team, Nancy Reardon and Mark Styles. They specialise in geological mapping and target generation (for drilling) for mineral exploration companies.

Calidus Resources is an ASX listed gold exploration company which controls the 410,000-ounce Warrawoona Gold Project in Pilbara Goldfield in Western Australia.

Nancy and Mark decided to switch from notebooks and paper data entry to direct collection of data via mobile GIS. After investigating ArcGIS and MapInfo, they were disappointed to find these options were extremely expensive, they then came across Mappt.

mappt_rodinia1

Problem

Nancy and Mark were originally collecting data by writing notes, taking GPS points and photos with a camera.

The process of compiling this data was extremely time consuming, inconvenient and less accurate. Mappt saves an enormous amount of time and rids the torturous task of data entry at the end of the day.

It was also very difficult for others to use the metadata, as clients would get a product map as a compilation and raw metadata.

Collecting data with Mappt allows clients to access and use the metadata easily, providing a better product for clients, more efficiently. Mappt was also significantly less expensive than the alternatives.

Objective

The objective for Rodinia Geological was to undertake geological mapping and analysis to define targets for drilling at Klondyke.

mappt-rodinia2-jpg

Solution

With ruggedised tablets, Nancy and Mark would enter point data, take associated geotagged photos and draw lines and polygons to represent various geological features when out in the field.

The team used Mappt offline in a remote location with no cell or data service. They found the drop-down forms tool the key to collecting data that could be directly imported into their desktop GIS software.

Nancy and Mark initially chose Mappt for affordability, however quickly discovered Mappt is very user friendly and has all the features they needed to make their field mapping significantly faster, cheaper and easier. Nancy and Mark imported imagery and existing data as a base map and collect point data using the drop-down form tool.

Home_mining

Outcome

The project is ongoing, with targets defined by Rodinia Geological to be drill-tested in future campaigns. Nancy and Mark will continue to use Mappt for future data collection, mapping and mobile GIS at Klondyke, as well as for projects for other clients.

Testimonial

“We love your product. I’ll be using it on a broker/analyst tour for a client. The platform allows an infinite amount of flexibility over old-school paper!”

– Mark, Rodinia Geological Services

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Mappt Elements: The Free Data Collection App for iOS

Mappt elements for iphone and ipad

You wanted it, you got it! Say hello to Mappt Elements, the free data collection app for iPhone and iPad… with a twist.

Lightning fast and meticulously accurate, Mappt Elements was born from years of experience in mobile GIS. It has been designed for you and your team – whatever level your GIS skills are – and is available for anyone to download from the App Store.

The difference between Mappt and Mappt Elements

Mappt Elements is very different from the fully-fledged Android version. It has a slick new look and is free to download, but the most impressive aspect is that it’s completely customisable.

We built Mappt Elements with an array of features available to purchase in-app, which means you only pay for the tools you need. So you can build up Mappt Elements to transform your iPhone into a simple data collection assistant, or a powerful in-field partner.

Mappt Elements Features

From environmental scientists experienced in GIS to local governments new to mapping technology, Mappt Elements is for anyone who wants to ditch desktop and capture data easily with an iOS device.

The seamless navigation and design make it easy for anyone to grasp, but don’t be fooled by its simple appearance, Mappt Elements has an impressive list of growing features that currently includes:

  • Create points and add attributes
  • Measurement Tools
  • Choose from a selection of base maps
  • Add your own WMS imagery layers
  • Load in Shapefiles and GeoJSON vector files as reference layers
  • Offline caching
  • Various export formats

To find out more, hit the button below and download it for FREE:

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Mappt Elements drop points, add data, export and report

How to use the Mappt Elements Form Builder

Mappt Elements also contains a unique external form builder. You can easily manage projects by making simple data collection forms and sharing them with your team for use in the field.

Create and customise projects using the Mappt Form Builder (see steps below) or by using one of the preset templates in app.Mappt Elements Export Tool

  1.  Build your form in app or visit www.mapptelements.com.au/form-builder.
  2. Create your form by specifying ‘required’ or essential attributes.
  3. Hit Upload Form and copy the generated code
  4. Head back into the app go to New > From a template code > Paste the code into the box and tap load.
  5. Once it has finished loading, enter the project’s name. The project will then be ready to use.

Export and report

Once you’ve created your project, Mappt Elements gives managers the flexibility to export information in a variety of ways:

  • Instantly generate PDF reports for quick distribution to clients and stakeholders
  • Export to all major GIS data formats such as Shapefile and KML, to integrate with QGIS, ArcInfo or Google Earth.
  • Export to CSV to view your data in an Excel spreadsheet.
  • Email data as an attachment, without having to return to the office.

When you’re ready to export your project and put the data to work, hit the Export button and choose your format. Please note that you must purchase the Export Package (AUD $4.99) to export in any formats other than CSV.  

To find out more, visit www.mapptelements.com.au, or download it now and explore the features yourself!

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Only on Android? No problem! Download a free trial of Mappt from the Google Play Store.

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Collector for ArcGIS vs Mappt – Feature Comparison Table

Esri’s Collector for ArcGIS and Takor’s Mappt are both widely used mobile GIS applications – but which has more in depth features and which is better value for money?

Below is a side by side comparison of all the features of ArcGIS Collector and Mappt.

For a more in depth review of the components of the two apps visit our previous blog post here.

Mappt vs ArcGISCollector Esri - feature comparison table

Mappt mobile GIS was designed and created for the field.

The geologist, the farmer, the miner, the data collector – whoever you are, wherever you are, Mappt is for the user. We strive to be the best mobile mapping app on the market.

If you need a further explanation of some of the differences between Mappt and Collector for ArcGIS click here.

We’d love to know which you prefer Esri’s Collector for ArcGIS or Mappt? Do you agree with our table? Comment below, Like us on Facebook or email info@mappt.com.au to contribute to the future of location technology.

START MY FREE MAPPT TRIAL

*Mappt Elements™ for iOS is currently available with selected features. For more info please visit mapptelements.com.au
NOTE: Mappt™ is in no way affiliated with Esri™ or Collector for ArcGIS™ in any way.

 

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How does Mobile GIS Help Civil Engineers and the Construction Industry?

Civil engineering encompasses the built environment. It is the brains behind the construction of buildings, bridges, roads, railways and water supplies – to name a few.

Engineering and construction play a vital role in the development and sustainability of our cities and urban infrastructure., so how is GIS and more specifically, mobile GIS, shaping the industry for the better?

What is a GIS?

A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a software that allows you to create, edit, store and share location-based data. It is a powerful technology used by a variety of industries for multiple purposes to solve real world problems, and the engineering and construction industries are no exception.

Mobile GIS is a relatively new concept for many industry experts due to the colossal enhancements in technology, which are allowing users to move away from desktop GIS. Mappt™ – a mobile GIS and data collection application – works offline and gives users the power to simplify field data collection and mapping in remote areas.

Operating on compact devices like tablets and mobile phones, Mappt has cast out the need for paper maps, forms, notepads, GPS tools and other finicky objects by combining them into one simple app.

Building infrastructure requires in depth planning and investigation of surrounding environments. Utilising a GIS allows you to view areas, coordinates, and parameters that would remain imprecise without the visualisation of data. Overlaying data on top of your map is an integral part of building comprehensive and accurate planning resources.

Mappt has the following features to make predesign analysis and calculations more efficient through onsite data collection and mapping. Below are just some of the ways mobile GIS is transforming the engineering and construction industry.

Download now

Importing & Exporting

Mappt allows you to quickly import any kind of map or GIS data for offline viewing in the field or onsite. Import a map with specific data onto Mappt and view this in any area you are working in on a light and compact device. Multiple maps can be imported and layered within the app, and you can adjust the opacity to see various attributes at once.

Points, Lines & Polygons

Once you are in the field with your maps loaded onto your device, you can drop a point, create a line or draw a polygon (straight-sided shape). Once you’ve added this kind of data onto your map you can add attributes or characteristics to each point, line or polygon to record more information.

wms

mappt-splitting-tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drop Down Forms

When recording additional information about a marker point, geotagged photo or polygon, users have the option to choose a drop-down form. Drop-down forms allow you to create several options to select when recording data out in the field, for example damaged or undamaged, slope stability, volume or material. This makes data collection faster and less repetitive for the field worker.

GET MY FREE MAPPT TRIAL

Geofencing

Geofences mark out inclusion or exclusion zones to ensure workers don’t go out of unmarked boundaries. If you step inside an exclusion zone such as heritage land, an alarm will notify the user and the event will be logged in Mappt. Alternatively, if you’re working in a small area, you can create an inclusion zone, and make sure you never step outside your boundary.

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geofence

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gridding & Measurement

Mappt has inbuilt measurement tools to calculate exact distances between areas. An overlaying grid with specific coordinates or sizes can be turned on and off to allow workers on site to visualise distances easier.

Map Annotations

Draw, add shapes and type text over your mapping data to give others clarification of your data. This handy, fun and colourful tool allows users to highlight areas of interest or point to a specific marker. You can screenshot the data and send it back to the office, or save it for later.

GPS Tracking

Whilst holding the device, Mappt will track and map your exact movements to provide transparency and accountability for workers on site. This is also handy if you ever need to retrace your steps but can’t remember the safe way back.

grid1

annotation tool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Import WMS/WFS/WMTS data feeds 

You can easily pull maps or their data from the web and into Mappt to work with out in the field.  If you’re worried about file sizes, you can choose to pull selected data from a set area within these maps to reduce the file size, allowing Mappt work as quickly as possible.

Aside from these valuable features, Mappt also gives users:

  • The ability to import vector data
  • Advanced API caching
  • Full layer control
  • Export data to local disk, email or Google Drive
  • Thematic mapping
  • Upload unlimited offline size files
  • Read-only data sets for huge files

Civil Engineers can use GIS to plan liveable communities and create lasting and meaningful infrastructure. With the recent surge in powerful mobile devices, GIS has become affordable and practical for all kinds of industries to increase efficiency and accuracy for collected data.

So whether you are analysing site suitability or implementing an underground piping system, Mappt is your number one tool for collecting, viewing, storing and sharing every type of geospatial data on and off your mobile device.

START MY FREE MAPPT TRIAL

Ssiobhan-profile2iobhan Herne
Marketing and Communications

Siobhan has no background in GIS, she’s a beginner, just like you. Follow her stories for an easier digest of all things geospatial.